The Apple Trap – Can I think differently?

I started off on a Mac when I was 15 (1991) and fell in love with Apple’s GUI and all that was Apple. I started designing and experimenting with my Apple and always felt like a trend setter with my Mac. When I started my company, Spunlogic, in 1998, I traveled around the world designing websites on my MacBook Pro; unfortunately, what I was designing and coding always looked different on a PC (Browser hell back in the day). Anyway my co-founder and I decided to switch the agency to PC’s (January 2000), mainly because they where cheaper and it simplified things when designing and developing as a team back then.

I got used to a PC and continued using one and forgot the days of Apple for several years. During that period Apple also lost it’s mojo, at least in my opinion. Continue reading

Widespread use of Mobile Payment through NFC just needs Apple

Apple is rumored to have well over 200 million+ users on iTunes with registered credit cards. That would make future iPhones enabled with Near Field Communications (NFC) chips an absolute dominator in mobile payments.  So what’s the hold up?

It’s rumored that Apple believes NFC standards are not wide spread enough and might be developing their own NFC standards. Although NFC has been slow to materialize in the US, the technology is pretty wide spread in Asia and Europe. 750,000 point-of-sale terminals already exist in the US, so all we are waiting for are NFC enabled devices. A number of mobile manufactures in the US such as Nokia, Samsung, Google, etc. have already released devices and it’s speculated that 50 million NFC-enabled devices worldwide will exist by the end of the year.

Apple has such an advantage with iTunes registered credit cards unlike any other retailer or manufacturing, they could literally define how we interact with NFC and make the use of mobile payments and more a reality faster than anyone. Continue reading

Why proximity-based apps are relevant for customer pull

Published on February 24th, MobileMarketer.com 

Distressed inventory in the travel business is the unsold hotel rooms and airplane seats that become available at the last minute on travel Web sites at fire-sale prices.

But a hotel manager in the near future could be relying on a proximity-based bidding network to convert a cancellation into a booking.

Today, travel brands typically attract consumers to peruse these bargain-priced goodies by dumping them on a travel portal – hotwire.com, priceline.com, Orbitz – or by sending promotional emails and text alerts to email addresses and mobile phones.

Yet a proximity-based marketing network could advertise discounted rooms to travelers driving along the interstate when they are just miles from the property. Room offers could be dispatched to car navigation systems and trigger an alert on the screen. Continue reading